Glossary - Click a letter to jump to that section


  • ABDOMINAL AORTA ULTRASOUND
    Ultrasound of the aorta in the abdominal cavity.
  • ABI WITH SEGMENTAL PRESSURESS
    The Ankle Brachial Index is used to measure the fall in blood pressure in arteries supplying the legs. It is also used to detect evidence of blockages (peripheral vascular disease).
  • ADENOSINE
    Adenosine is a naturally occurring chemical in the body. While performing a stress test, it is injected into the body through an IV. It is used to create 'stress' on the heart, and forces the blood vessels to work harder.
  • ANGIOGRAM
    X-ray pictures of your blood vessels taken with a special liquid called contrast dye. Angiograms are used to see narrowing or blockage in arteries.
  • ANGIOPLASTY
    A procedure in which a balloon is passed through to the blocked area of an artery and inflated to push the plaque against the vessel wall.
  • ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET
    Medicines that slow down the clotting of blood.
  • ARTERIAL DOPPLER ULTRASOUND (lower and upper extremities)
    Ultrasound of the arteries of the legs and arms.
  • ARTERY
    A blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood away from the heart to the rest of the body.
  • ARRHYTHMIA
    An arrhythmia is a change in either the speed or the pattern of your heartbeat, causing an abnormal heart rhythm.
  • ATHERSCLEROSIS
    Build up of fatty substances that causes narrowing and hardening of the blood vessels.
  • BALLOON CATHETER
    A thin tube with a balloon attached to the tip that can be inflated to open blocked arteries.
  • CARDIAC ANGIOGRAPHY
    Cardiac Angiography is a minimally invasive procedure used to access the coronary circulation and blood filled chambers of the heart using a catheter. It is performed for both diagnostic and interventional (treatment) purposes.
  • CAROTID ARTERIES
    Arteries in your neck that supply blood to the brain
  • CAROTID ARTERY DISEASE
    A condition that reduces the blood flow through the carotid arteries to the brain.
  • CAROTID ULTRASOUND
    An ultrasound of the carotid arteries, located in the neck.
  • CATHETER
    A tube through which fluids or devise can be introduced or removed from the body.
  • CATHETER ABLATION
    Catheter ablation is a relatively low-risk, non-surgical procedure used to ablate (destroy) parts of an abnormal electrical pathway that is causing a heart rhythm problem. During the ablation, doctors insert an electrode catheter into the heart near the abnormal pathway that destroys the abnormal area of the tissue using heat.
  • COUMADIN
    Coumadin (Warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner) used to reduce the formation of blood clots. Patients who have been prescribed Coumadin are monitored closely by our Coumdin nurses. They have regularly scheduled appointments where dosing is monitored and may be adjusted.
  • DOBUTAMINE
    Dobutamine is a medication used to increase the heart rate and blood pressure- similar to the effects of exercising.
  • DOBUTAMINE STRESS ECHOCARDIOCARDIOGRAM
    The Dobutamine Stress Echo is a Stress Echocardiogram used for patients who are unable to exercise on the treadmill. Instead of the physical activity, dobutamine is injected via IV, and produces similar effects to the heart as exercising does. This procedure is used to evaluate coronary artery disease.
  • DOPPLER ULTRASOUND
    A non-invasive test that uses sound waves to produce images such as images of a narrow blood vessel.
  • ECHOCARDIOGRAM
    An echocardiogram uses ultrasound waves to create an image of the heart and the pattern of blood flow through it. It shows how well the heart is pumping.
  • STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAM
    A stress echocardiogram is an exercise test that evaluates the heart using both an EKG and an ultrasound machine. The patient undergoing a stress echocardiogram is generally walking on a treadmill while being observed.
  • EP STUDY
    An EP Study is an accurate method for studying the heart's electrical system. It allows doctors to find abnormal sites inside the heart that may be causing serious arrhythmias. During an EP study, doctors insert special electrode catheters that can sense electrical activity in different parts of the heart. This study will help your doctor diagnose your problem accurately and decide the best treatment for you.
  • ELECTRICAL CARDIOVERSION
    The electrical cardioversion is a very effective medical procedure during which the heart is given a brief electrical shock to change an abnormal heart rhythm back to a normal rhythm.
  • EVENT RECORDER
    An Event Recorder (also known as a Loop Recorder) is a patient activated 45 second EKG. There are several types of Event Recorders available: patient activated or auto triggered. Event Recorders may be worn up to 30 days. An Implantable Loop Recorder is a small device implanted under the skin that is used to determine if there is an abnormal heart rhythm causing symptoms such as palpitations, light-headedness, dizziness, or syncope.
  • HOLTER MONITOR
    A Holter Monitor is a device worn for the continuous recording of EKG signals on a magnetic card for scanning. It is used to detect a selection of significant but fleeting changes that might otherwise escape notice. It is generally worn a constant 24 to 48 hours.
  • HYPERTENSION
    High Blood Pressure
  • ICD
    An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or ICD, is a small electronic devise that is implanted into your body to treat life-threatening rapid heart rhythms. The ICD monitors your heart rhythm at all times. If it senses a dangerously fast rhythm, the ICD delivers electrical impulses and/or shocks to restore a normal heart rhythm.
  • INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY
    Interventional Cardiology is a branch of cardiology that deals specifically with the catheter based treatment of structural heart diseases.
  • MUGAs (Multiple Gated Acquisitions)
    MUGAs measure the pumping function of the heart. They calculate the percentage of blood that is pumped from the heart to the body. This is useful in monitoring patients with many types of heart disease.
  • NON-INVASIVE PROCEDURE
    A procedure that is done without putting anything inside the body.
  • NUCLEAR STRESS TEST
    A nuclear stress test (myocardial perfusion study) examines the blood flow to the heart muscle. These studies are performed with the IV injection of a small amount of a radiopharmaceutical at rest and during the test. The medicines include adenosine, dobutamine, and thallium.
  • PACEMAKER
    A pacemaker is a small, lightweight electronic devise that is prescribed for people whose hearts are beating too slowly. It is implanted into the body, usually in the upper chest, near the shoulder. The pacemaker's job is to keep track of the heart's electrical activity. If it senses that the heart is beating too slowly or is pausing too long between beats, the pacemaker delivers electrical impulses that pace (stimulate) the heart and keep it beating at the proper speed. It will also require regular checks with your physician's office in person or via the telephone. This will ensure that the pacemaker is working properly and that the battery is still in good condition.
  • PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE
    A condition that affects the blood vessels outside of the heart.
  • PET SCAN
    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is one of the most frequently used molecular imaging procedures. Molecular imaging is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures of what is happening inside the body at the molecular and cellular level. Where other diagnostic imaging procedures—such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound—predominantly offer anatomical pictures, molecular imaging allows physicians to see how the body is functioning and to measure its chemical and biological processes. PET is highly effective at detecting heart conditions and other diseases.
  • RENAL DOPPLER ULTRASOUND
    Ultrasound of the renal arteries, located in the kidneys.
  • STENOSIS
    Narrowing in an artery.
  • STENT
    A small latticed metal tube that is permanently placed inside a blood vessel to give it structural support and keep it open.
  • STROKE
    Tissue damage in the brain caused by lack of oxygen. Damage depends on the location and extent of brain tissue affected.
  • SYNCOPE
    Medical term for fainting.
  • THALLIUM
    Thallium is a radioactive isotope injected through an IV during a nuclear stress test. It is used to evaluate the blood flow through the heart.
  • TILT TABLE TESTING
    A tilt table test can be used in some cases to determine the cause of fainting spells. The test is used to induce symptoms of syncope in a closely monitored atmosphere. The complete test generally lasts from one to two hours, and consists of lying on a table that is slowly moved upright (head up, feet down). The information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis of your condition and develop a treatment plan that is best for you.
  • TRANSESOPHAGEAL ECHO
    A transesophageal echocardiogram, or TEE, is a procedure that uses ultrasound waves to examine the heart. It is done from the inside of the esophagus, and provides much clearer images of the heart than a standard echo test.
  • TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK (TIA)
    Temporary symptoms of stroke. A patient who has TIA may be at a higher risk for stroke.
  • VENOUS DOPPLER ULTRASOUND (lower and upper extremities)
    Ultrasound of the veins in the legs and arms.


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